Corey Haim’s ‘Lost’ Reality Series: ‘It’s Not Just About Getting Well. It’s About Staying Well’

The late Corey Haim‘s tragic struggles with substance abuse—and heroic efforts to kick the habit—were documented in a TV show that never saw the light of day.

On Jan. 6, 2009, the beloved actor, who died on March 10 of a prescription-drug overdose, and will be laid to rest today in his hometown of Toronto, broke the news to BlogTalkRadio of a reality series titled Lost Boy Found.

"The reason I want the whole world to watch me recover is because I can help people," Corey (above in the pilot) told us of his drug addiction.

"The reason I want the whole world to watch me recover is because I can help people," Corey (above in the pilot) told us of his drug addiction.

An allusion to the 1987 cult-horror flick The Lost Boys— starring Corey, Kiefer Sutherland, Jason Patrick and Corey Feldman Lost Boy Found was meant to educate rather than sensationalize.

“We want to do this through music,” Corey, who sang and played keyboards, told Blockhead Rod host Rod Gambrel of the project. “I’m in very good spirits right now. It’s just that I’m ‘under the rock’” (which is to say, below rock bottom).

“If I can touch one person, starting with myself, obviously…This [series] will be a wonderful, wonderful vehicle for me to help others.”

Lost Boy Found—the pilot for which was shot by Jim Katz, an accountant-turned-TV-producer who won an Emmy Award for his work with NBC Sports at the 1988 Seoul Olympic games—was to center on Corey’s relationship with British rocker Gerard McMahon, aka G Tom Mac.

-"I'm broke and I'm homeless and I didn't expect myself to be in this situation-ever," he says in the shelved series.

"I'm broke and I'm homeless and I didn't expect myself to be in this situation—ever," he said in the shelved series.

G Tom wrote the tune Cry Little Sister, which was featured on The Lost Boys soundtrack album, which in turn led to a friendship with Corey years later.

“If Corey can stay sober, G Tom Mac will take him out on tour, to perform with [G Tom's band] live in concert,” a promo for the series explains.

“It’s gonna show Corey in a positive light and help other people go through this horrible disease called addiction,” G Tom told Rod during the Jan. 6 interview.

Eight days later, on Jan. 14, Corey and G Tom returned to BlogTalkRadio to discuss the project in more detail.

“It’s basically me just keeping my butt together, my whole act together in general. And if that happens, other great things will follow,” Corey told Vamp Radio host Amy McCracken. “It’s not just about getting well, it’s about staying well.

“It’s one day at a time. It’s one second at a time-it’s really one millisecond at a time sometimes,” he added of his long battle with substance abuse. “But you gotta grind your teeth and bear it. There’s no way to get around it. It’s just time, effort and support—and you gotta reach out and ask for help.

“For me, when I came to terms with ‘I do have a disease, I do have a natural problem,’ everything kind of got better and molded itself into shape. I’m a lot clearer, I can see my face again, which is a wonderful thing, because I got real puffy and overweight there for a while. I was real skinny, I was about 132 pounds and doing crazy things.”

-"To be at the top of my game and fall this hard-I'm getting to rock bottom," he adds.

"To be at the top of my game and fall this hard—I'm getting to rock bottom," he added.

Corey also discussed his inspiration for trying to kick. When a caller asked, “What single instance made you decide to get clean?” he replied:

“My mom. I looked at my mom and I just saw in her eyes that she’d had enough. I looked at her and said, ‘I’m done. I am done. I’ve had enough. I’ve partied for 222 lifetimes and I’ve had enough. It’s over.’

Additionally, he touched on the then-sore subject of fellow teen idol Corey Feldman, with whom he co-starred in the half-scripted/half-reality series The Two Coreys, which aired on A&E from July 2007 through August 2008.

When a caller asked, “I was wondering if you and Corey Feldman ever talk anymore,” Corey said:

“Nope. We do not. It’s probably for the better. We’re in a cool-down mode right now. I mean, you know someone for so long, it’s like ‘brotherly love.’ But this goes a little beyond that.

“I’m not going to get into the logistics of it, but it’s definitely a better thing for myself and my life that I have no communication with Feldman.”

This week, Corey Feldman (who had recently reconciled with Corey) announced that he won’t attend his pal’s burial.

“The family has decided to make Corey’s funeral on Tuesday a small private affair,” he said in a statement. “Understanding the recent media attention and to be respectful of the family’s wishes I have decided not to attend. Instead I will remain in Los Angeles quietly mourning and planning his memorial.”

The read E! Entertainment’s report on the status of the Lost Boy Found pilot, click here.

To hear Corey’s Blockhead Rod interview, click here.

To hear Corey’s Vamp Radio interview, click here.

To read more about Corey’s life—and those who loved him—click here to get to his official website.

4 thoughts on “Corey Haim’s ‘Lost’ Reality Series: ‘It’s Not Just About Getting Well. It’s About Staying Well’

  1. Jen

    Corey Feldman and Corey Haim were not estranged at the time of Corey’s death…there was a very recent video of the two released by TMZ that showed them three weeks before Corey’s death hanging out in Hollywood and both said that the other was their best friend for life. This entry should be amended in order to be accurate, in my opinion because it paints a completely wrong impression of their relationship.

    Reply
  2. Ireanna

    I really think this should be rewritten to point out that Corey has died of natural causes and NOT of a drug overdose.

    Reply

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