Tag Archives: BlogTalkRadio’s Icon Fetch

‘Icon Fetch’ Host Tony Peters a Cut Above ‘His Fellow Web-Based Hosts,’ Says Dayton Daily News

Another day, another one of our fabulous hosts profiled in his hometown paper.

This time it’s Ohioan Tony Peters, whose Icon Fetch, in recent months alone, has been graced by such pop-music figures as Tom Johnson of The Doobie Brothers, Chris Difford of Squeeze, Jesse Valenzuela of the Gin Blossoms, Gary Brooker of Procol Harum and (our fave) Maria Muldaur, who scored a monster hit with 1974′s Midnight at the Oasis.

Tony: Hey! You! Come on-to my show.

Tony: Subterranean blues—and pop, and rock, and soul and so on.

In a story headlined “Former Disc Jockey Hosts Show from His Basement,” the Dayton Daily News writes:

“In many ways the Internet is still a wild frontier, where Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists and home hobbyist alike are free to explore their passions online. Unfortunately, for every part-time blogger or podcast host offering content that is professional, insightful and Continue reading

Solomon Burke: 1940-2010. ‘It was a great dream for me, in my lifetime, that will never happen again,’ legend said of final album

The King of Rock ‘N’ Soul is gone.

Solomon Burke—who penned such classic tunes as Cry to Me and Everybody Needs Somebody to Love—died of natural causes earlier today at Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport after a flight from his hometown of Los Angeles. He was 70 years old.

The legendary soul singer had been due to perform with Dutch rock band De Dijk this Tuesday.

Just six months ago, Solomon dropped by BlogTalkRadio to chat about his then-just-released album, Nothing’s Impossible, which was masterminded by Memphis producer Willie Mitchell—the man behind all of Al Green‘s hits during the ‘70s.

"The spirit that's in those songs is locked in for the people of the world—and me," Solomon told us of his final, Willie Mitchell-produced CD. "I was designated spiritually to sing those songs."

"The spirit that's in those songs is locked in for the people of the world—and me," Solomon told us of his final, Willie Mitchell-produced CD. "I was designated spiritually to sing those songs."

Just 10 days after Solomon and Willie completed Nothing’s Impossible, Willie passed away at age 81.

Interviewed May 4 of this year on Icon Fetch, Solomon chatted for 20 minutes about his storied career and the making of his final album.

“We had a relationship over the phone and through conversations of other people for, like, 30 years-without meeting each other,” Solomon told host Tony Peters of Willie.

“I had been in Memphis several times and Continue reading

Doobie Brothers Frontman Tom Johnston: Michael McDonald Was a, ah, ‘Blessing’ for the Band

We’d be fools to believe that original Doobie Brothers vocalist and guitarist Tom Johnston wasn’t a little—just a tad, mind you—envious of Michael McDonald.

After all, it was Michael who propelled the band to superstar status in 1979, by composing and arranging What a Fool Believes, which snagged them their first-ever Grammy Award. Three Grammys, in fact—for Record of the Year, Song of the Year and Best Vocal Arrangement.

CAPTION: "I left the band in ‘77 because I just decided this isn't working for me," Tom (above) tells us of his Doobie departure. "I just left and went and played baseball for a year."

"I left in ‘77 because I decided this isn't working for me," Tom (above) tells us of dumping The Doobies. "I just left and went and played baseball for a year."

Co-written with Kenny Loggins, the tune, which hit No.1 on the pop charts, featured backup vocals by none other than Michael Jackson, who also sang on two of Michael’s (McDonald’s, that is) other tracks from the Minute by Minute album: Here to Love You and Minute by Minute, the latter winning The Doobies their fourth Grammy, for Best Pop Vocal Performance.

Interviewed on Icon Fetch, Tom—who co-founded The Doobies in 1970 but was replaced by Michael in 1975 due to a peptic ulcer—reflects on Michael’s contributions to the band.

When host Tony Peters points out that Michael took Continue reading