Tag Archives: the lost interview

Jerry Seinfeld’s Lost Interview: ‘I have no desire to be part of most of the crap you see on TV’

Long before Jerry Seinfeld signed a deal with NBC to develop his show about nothing, he had nothing but the highest of standards in mind for such a sitcom.

In a 1987 interview with Milling About host Robin Milling—which has never before aired anywhere—the then-33-year-old funnyman chatted about his influences, his development as a performer, the role of confidence in his craft, and the possibility of headlining on the small screen.

CAPTION: "It's not what I did as a kid, but what I fail to do as an adult that makes be a comedian—which is grow up," Jerry (above) said.

"It's not what I did as a kid, but what I fail to do as an adult that makes me a comedian—which is grow up," Jerry (above) said.

When asked, “Do you have any interest in having your own show?” Jerry said:

“No. Not unless it was by some very high-quality people. A Cheers type of situation or something like that.

“But I have no desire to be part of most of the crap you see on TV, just so I could say, ‘Hey, I got a TV show!’ That’s no big deal.

As to which crap in particular, Jerry added, “The Facts of Life. Things like that.”

And speaking of future aspirations, the standup said: “I don’t really have any. I just want to get good at this.

“To me, I feel like I’m a musician and this is my instrument and I want Continue reading

Dick Clark’s Lost Interview: My Close Call with the Wrath of Madonna’s Manager

Dick Clark may have been the dean of the pop-music scene for more than five decades, but that doesn’t mean he’s any better at picking winners than your average armchair critic.

Case in point, the American Music Awards—which he himself founded in 1973.

CAPTION: Dick: Made Her Madgesty parachute in from Penny Marshall's movie set.

Dick: Made Her Madgesty parachute in from Penny Marshall's movie set.

In an interview with Milling About host Robin Milling from New Year’s Eve 1992—which has never before aired anywhere—the cultural icon chatted about wrangling nominees into the theater for the event.

“Years ago I talked to [Madonna‘s then-manager] Freddy DeMann. I said, ‘Madonna must be here— she’s up for two awards. I mean, you must know in your heart that she’s going to win those awards. She’s a runaway smash hit,” he said of the 1991 AMAs, while the Material Girl was filming A League of Their Own.

“They arranged a convoy and strategic air command sort of thing and got Continue reading

Rogert Daltrey’s Lost Interview: I’m a Boring Homebody (but a Good Dad)

Contrary to what you’d expect from those of a rocker whose pyrotechnic stage antics helped define the ‘60s, Roger Daltrey‘s kids are alright.

In a 1989 interview with host Robin Milling, which has never before aired anywhere, The Who frontman discussed his career from the New York set of The Teddy Bear Habit. (That never-released feature film, co-starring Sam Waterston and George Carlin, tells the story of a music-shop owner who helps a child break his attachment to his teddy bear.)

CAPTION: "I always knew I would make it," Roger (above) of becoming a rock star. "The human being is capable of anything he desires to do if he wants it bad enough."

"I always knew I'd make it," Roger (above) says of becoming a star. "The human being is capable of anything he desires to do if he wants it bad enough."

“It’s terrible but it’s probably true but I’m so happy being with my kids. I really do enjoy them,” Roger said when asked about becoming a dad.

“It’s wonderful to be with them in these last seven years apart from The Who. Back then, there wasn’t that much time to really enjoy them. It was always kind of a barrier.

“I’ve got a really boring rock story. I’ve been with the same woman for 22 years. I’ve got five kids, three from my present wife.”

Roger—who played the lead in the 1975 film version of The Who’s rock opera Tommy, and Continue reading

Jerry Garcia’s Lost Interview: ‘The Grateful Dead Would Love to Play on Mars’

Talk about breaking new ground! The late Jerry Garcia—who would have turned 68 years old this Sunday, Aug. 1—had sky-high hopes for his famously peripatetic band, the Grateful Dead.

In a 1990 interview with Milling About host Robin Milling, which has never before aired anywhere, the legendary rocker discussed his health, drug problem, family and aspirations for The Dead.

CAPTION: "So you've had a problem with drugs? Who hasn't?" Jerry (above) told our host vis-à-vis his own substance-abuse struggles.

"So I've had a problem with drugs? Who hasn't?" Jerry (above) told our host.

“I’ve never had a heart attack. Let me clear that up right now. But I have been ill and was on drugs, yeah,” said the Casey Jones singer, who died of a heart attack on Aug. 9, 1995 at Serenity Knolls, a substance-abuse treatment center in Forest Knolls, Calif.

“But those things are kind of normal nowadays, a lot of people went through those things. They don’t represent good excuses as far as I’m concerned.”

Jerry went on to talk about what inspired him to try and clean up his act.

“I think the idea that, well, it looks like I’m going to live past 40 and Continue reading

Lost Tony Bennett Interview: Pop Icon Recalls Shotgun-Toting Stalker—Who Might Still Be at Large

His heart may be in San Francisco, but Tony Bennett almost had his guts spilled all over Buffalo.

In a 1995 interview by Robin Milling—which has never before been made public in its entirety—the legendary crooner told our host of a homicidal stalker he encounter during the 1950s.

Be

Because of him: "It's taught me to watch it for the rest of my life," Tony (above) said of being stalked by a psycho.

“When I first started, we had a tremendous scare that I’ve never really quite gotten over.

“I was up in Buffalo and there was a club owner there, Harry Altman, who owned the Town Casino,” Tony told Robin.

“He said, ‘There’s a whole stack of letters here and this man is threatening he’s going to kill you.’ He was a demented person who called me a communist one night or thought I stole his wife the second night.

“Each letter was more morbid than the last. He said, Continue reading